Take action: Support peace in South Sudan

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For the past six years, the people of South Sudan have lived with the violence of civil war, and it has taken a significant humanitarian toll: 400,000 South Sudanese citizens have been killed, 1.9 million have been internally displaced, and 2.3 million have fled the country. Over seven million people — about two thirds of the population— are in need of aid.

Last September, there was a glimmer of hope when the warring parties signed a new peace agreement to end the violence and form a unity government. Today, South Sudan is at a turning point: the signers of the agreement must live up to their promise and meet a critical deadline, set forth in the current peace deal, to refrain from violence and form an inclusive, sustainable transitional government.

Senate Resolution 371 reaffirms the commitment of the U.S. Congress in supporting peace in South Sudan, encouraging the successful implementation of the new transitional government by the impending deadline. Failure to meet this deadline could trigger renewed violence, mass displacement, and greater suffering.

Please urge your Members of Congress to pass Senate Resolution 371. Peace in South Sudan depends on it.

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My Message

Dear Member of Congress,

As your constituent, I am writing to urge you to support peace in South Sudan by co-sponsoring Senate Resolution 371.

Over the past six years, South Sudan has seen the largest humanitarian crisis in sub-Saharan Africa. 400,000 South Sudanese citizens have been killed, 1.9 million have been internally displaced, and 2.3 million have fled the country. The conflict has left seven million people, approximately two-thirds of the country’s population, acutely food insecure and in need of humanitarian assistance. In April, the UN Panel of Experts on South Sudan reported ongoing obstruction of humanitarian access and violations and abuses of human rights, including alarmingly high rates of sexual violence.

The humanitarian circumstances are dire, but there is cause for hope: last September, the warring parties signed a new peace agreement to end the violence and form a unity government. However, several civil society organizations indicate that those party to the current peace agreement have not yet met the pre-conditions required for the formation of a sustainable, inclusive national government.

If an inclusive, representative government is not formed, the consequences would be dire: it could trigger large-scale violence within South Sudan, worsening the already critical humanitarian crisis plaguing the country today. It would also threaten regional stability. A new wave of mass displacement would strain neighbors Sudan and Ethiopia, in turn threatening nascent political transitions in these countries.

Senate Resolution 371 reaffirms the United States’ commitment to sustainable peace in South Sudan, calling on leaders in South Sudan to uphold the provisions of the current peace deal. It also reaffirms the United States’ investment in immediate humanitarian lifesaving assistance and continued interest in peace in the region. Importantly, the resolution encourages the successful implementation of a transitional government, supporting a necessary provision for sustainable peace in South Sudan.

I sincerely hope that you will stand with the people of South Sudan and co-sponsor Senate Resolution 371. Millions of people depend on it.

Sincerely,

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