Adolescent Girls in Northern Nigeria: Financial Inclusion and Entrepreneurship Opportunities

Nigeria, April 26, 2013

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Adolescent Girls in Northern Nigeria: Financial Inclusion and Entrepreneurship Opportunities Profile profiled 1,800 adolescent girls (ages 15 to 19) and private sector actors across the northern Nigeria to identify key barriers and opportunities for financial inclusion and entrepreneurship for girls.

Highlights from Mercy Corps report include:

•Adolescent girls are engaged in economic activities. A third of respondents currently run their own business or have small economic activities in the informal sector and in female-dominated industries. Girls who run their own enterprise expressed a higher rate of control over their income.

•Adolescent girls want to grow their existing business or start a business. Over three-fourths of the respondents want to grow their businesses or start a business. 73% of these same girls would want or need their business to be located in or around their home, followed by a market (21%), commercial district (3%), roadside (3%), or mobile (1%).

•Adolescent girls participate in informal rotating saving and credit groups. 40% of girls participate in savings and credit groups. The majority of girls participate in savings groups to save money to start their own business or small economic activity (69%), to pay school fees (12%), household needs (10%), marriage (5%), and medical expenses (2%). An additional 8% saved in formal financial institutions. In addition, 60% of female respondents expressed an interest in learning saving techniques and engaging with formal financial institutions.

Files

PDF icon Mercy Corps February 2013 - Adolescent Girls in Northern Nigeria.pdf

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