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Photos of distribution in Juba displacement camp

South Sudan, January 21, 2014

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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    A woman cradles her child beneath a makeshift shelter at one of the displacement camps in South Sudan's capital of Juba. More than half a million people have fled their homes in response to warfare raging in the country, including 494,000 internally displaced and 86,100 who escaped to neighboring countries. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Camps are overcrowded as escalating violence continues to force families to flee new areas. Around 67,400 people are seeking refuge inside U.N. bases — nearly 80% of whom are women and children. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    People have organized themselves in the camp, but space is limited — shelters and tents are clustered very close together, leaving families with little privacy. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Mercy Corps staff unload supplies from a delivery truck to distribute to families seeking shelter at one of the U.N. bases in Juba. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    We are distributing kits to families that contain a sleeping mat, a blanket, a jerry can for water, a cooking set, a mosquito net and a Kanga, fabric that can be used for clothing or coverage from the sun. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Organization is key during distributions to ensure that goods go to families who need them most. This woman is being registered by Mercy Corps staff before receiving her kit. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    There are only a few showers and latrines to serve nearly 20,000 people in this one camp alone. Even without these most basic services, families choose to be here — they are too scared to leave the safety of the U.N. base's walls. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    So far, with our partners, we've distributed over 8,600 kits, reaching more than 22,000 people at the two U.N. bases in Juba. Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Mary, 27, had to flee her home in Juba when violence broke out in the capital. "The pack given by Mercy Corps will help my family every day. My baby is a few days old, and he'll be able to sleep on the blanket instead of the ground." Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Wenny, 29, fled with her four children in mid-December from her home in Jonglei, where the heaviest fighting started and has been centered. "Before we were sleeping on the ground, now thanks to the distribution, we'll sleep on a mat. It also gets very cold at night, the blanket will change my nights." Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Nianey Sarat, 32, is from neighboring Jonglei State. Alone with her five children, Nianey is very grateful for what she was given. Nianey explains, "I'm not sad, because I'm safe now." Photo: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps

The conflict in South Sudan is forcing thousands of families to flee their homes and seek safety from marauding fighters each day. Despite threats and looting, our teams continue working in close coordination with partners to meet the urgent needs of those displaced.

At one of the camps at a U.N. base in the capital of Juba, we brought more supplies like blankets, soap and cooking tools to families last Thursday. In these photos from the distribution, see how people are coping in the crowded conditions and why these basic items are so essential now.

Learn more about our emergency response since fighting erupted in mid-December ▸