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Short Notes from Today

February 1, 2008

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  <span class="field-credit">
    Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps  </span>
    One of the daughters of Tereza Deng, who organizes a local women's group that Mercy Corps has supported, cleaning dishes as part of the morning routine at the house. Photo: Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps
  • 
  <span class="field-credit">
    Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps  </span>
    Tereza leads the way to one of the "tukuls" in the distance, a traditional Sudanese hut made from poles, mud and dried grass. The landscape is typical of the area around Agok. Photo: Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps
  • 
  <span class="field-credit">
    Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps  </span>
    I drew a crowd in Ajakuac talking with a returnee farmer who'd received one of 26 pedal-powered water pumps we distributed earlier in the day. The bricks drying behind us were made by participants in our cash-for-work program, which — according to the village's dean of shopkeepers — has boosted business in the market. Photo: Miguel Samper for Mercy Corps

As I interviewed Tereza Deng, who organizes a local women's group, at her home in Juol Jok this morning, Miguel observed the a.m. routine at the family compound. He captured this image of one of her daughters cleaning dishes:

Later, Tereza escorted us to her office. It's one of the "tukuls" in the distance, a traditional Sudanese hut made from poles, mud and dried grass. This shot illustrates a typical landscape in Abyei area:

I drew a crowd in Ajakuac in the afternoon, talking with a returnee farmer who'd received one of 26 pedal-powered water pumps we distributed earlier in the day. The bricks drying behind us were made by participants in our cash-for-work program, which — according to the village's dean of shopkeepers — has boosted business in the market: