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The Headless Horsemen ride again (this time for Mercy Corps)!

August 31, 2010

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  <span class="field-credit">
    Courtesy Ichabod Caine  </span>
    Legendary Seattle radio personality Ichabod Caine is the founder of the Headless Horsemen. Photo: Courtesy Ichabod Caine
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  <span class="field-credit">
    Ken Board for Headless Horsemen  </span>
    Twenty-seven Headless Horsemen pose with Bill and Melba O'Neill (donors since 1980) in Shelton, Wash., during the Mercy Corps benefit ride, Aug 28. Photo: Ken Board for Headless Horsemen

The Headless Horsemen (HH) a Northwest-based band of bikers, rode to benefit Mercy Corps last Saturday, Aug. 28. The 27 riders logged 300 miles through the Puget Sound area of WA. Bill and Melba O'Neill, Mercy Corps supporters in Shelton (and my parents!), hosted a thirst-quenching pit-stop and were presented with an honorary certificate of membership in the HH. The ride raised several thousand dollars (and rising) for children and families in flashpoints of need including Haiti and Pakistan.

It was just the latest benefit outing for HH founder, Ichabod Caine, Harley-riding, Seattle rock/country radio personality. And, yes, that is his legal name. "Icky" has been a good friend since the mid 80s and told me back then he would one day own a Harley Davidson motorcycle like mine. Decades later, he bought a fire-engine red Harley from a Seattle fireman and soon launched the HH for the purpose of sharing the passion of motorcycling with folks who ride all kinds of bikes for a number of charities. The first HH fundraiser was the Seattle "Ride for Kids" in 2007.

"The Mercy Corps ride was an opportunity for us to have a global impact," says Marty Conrad, a 911 dispatcher and HH coordinator. "This was a great first annual ride!" Pierce County Police officer, Ken Board, served as the official HH photographer and agrees there will be more rides for more charities in the future, including Mercy Corps.

In 1999 I organized a Harley ride for Kosovo war refugees with the help of Eastside Harley Davidson in Bellevue, WA. In spite of driving rain, 70 riders turned out and helped to make a positive difference in the lives of homeless people half a world away. It has been a long, dry spell for charity riding for me but I am back in the saddle and ready to hit the road at a moment's notice. And now that I am a full member of the HH, more road trips are on the horizon.

Donations can still be made! Click here and weigh in.

It's hard work, this motorcycling business. But someone has to do it!